Provocative Pieces

Setting School Culture With Social And Emotional Learning Routines | MindShift | KQED News

“It puts me in a focused and good mood,” said Monica, a third grader at the school. Every morning during the 15-minute meeting, students greet each other, have sharing time, do a quick movement activity and review the schedule for the day. Educators say this routine is an invaluable way to help students transition from home to school; it helps build a community where students feel cared for, known and ready to learn.

via Setting School Culture With Social And Emotional Learning Routines | MindShift | KQED News

Time for a new approach to motivating millennials | SmartBrief

The Values Point of View model reinforces three key notions:

Programmed values aren’t nearly as powerful as developed values. A developed value is thoughtfully chosen from alternatives, with an understanding of the consequences of the alternatives, and acted on over time, prized and publicly owned.
Values are individually held and issue-based. A value is a choice you make regarding a specific issue. You can hold one type of value when it comes to women’s rights and another when it comes to gun control. The problem is that many people fail to explore their values and underlying beliefs, depending instead on unexplored programmed values that are general and generational.
Values are at the heart of motivation. Programmed values are more likely to lead to suboptimal motivation; developed values are more likely to result in optimal motivation. When we take action that is aligned with our developed values, we experience vitality, sustainable positive energy and greater sense of well-being.
Whether a boomer, Gen X’er, millennial, or Gen Z’er, if you don’t understand the ends and means of the values you hold, you are most likely operating on programmed values without realizing it. Emphasizing generational values is not only personally limiting, but it also creates organizational problems.

via Time for a new approach to motivating millennials | SmartBrief

Why Children Aren’t Behaving, And What You Can Do About It | MindShift | KQED News

I would never tell someone who’s using a discipline strategy that they feel really works that they’re wrong. What I say to my mom is, “The tools and strategies that you used and our grandparents used weren’t wrong, they just don’t work with modern kids.” Ultimately, we want to instill self-discipline in our children, which will never happen if we’re always controlling them.

via Why Children Aren’t Behaving, And What You Can Do About It | MindShift | KQED News

Nonacademic Skills Are Key To Success. But What Should We Call Them?

 

More and more people in education agree on the importance of learning stuff other than academics.

But no one agrees on what to call that “stuff”.

via Nonacademic Skills Are Key To Success. But What Should We Call Them? : NPR Ed : NPR

Why Teens Should Understand Their Own Brains (And Why Their Teachers Should, Too!) : NPR Ed : NPR

How does social media influence all this?

It really matters to teenagers to be included by their social group, by their friends, and so they’re more likely to go along with what their friends think. Social media like Instagram or Snapchat or Facebook or whatever it might be, allows teenagers to exercise their desire to make social contact all the time. They never get away from it, even in the middle of the night.
There’s not very much research on how social media affects the developing brain, but one area that I’m pretty convinced by is the effect on sleep. A lot of young people who I work with, they will have their phones on all night. They won’t turn them off. They won’t put them on silent and they even respond to messages that come in throughout the night. That surely affects sleep and we all know that sleep is so critical for mental health and learning.

via Why Teens Should Understand Their Own Brains (And Why Their Teachers Should, Too!) : NPR Ed : NPR

12 Ways Teachers Can Build Their Own Resilience | Cult of Pedagogy

BE A LEARNER
“Resilient people are curious,” Aguilar says. “Resilient people experience a challenge and turn around and say, Wow. That was really hard. That pushed me to my limits. What can I learn from that? Just that question alone immediately propels you into a place of being able to build your resilience.” So this month, teachers are encouraged to reflect on who they are as learners, to better understand the stages of the learning process, and to practice seeing challenges as invitations to curiosity.

PLAY AND CREATE
One tool for building resilience that is easy to overlook is the habit of play. “I think it’s a human right to be creative, to create, enjoy, and appreciate art,” Aguilar says. “Playing and creating can unlock inner resources for dealing with stress, for solving problems…it can help us see different things and find different approaches to tackle challenges.” This month—which may hit right around spring break—teachers are encouraged to build regular periods of play and creation into their daily lives.

TELL EMPOWERING STORIES

“The space where we can have the greatest impact on our resilience is between a thing that happens and how we interpret and make sense of that thing,” Aguilar says. That interpretation takes the form of a story we tell ourselves.

via 12 Ways Teachers Can Build Their Own Resilience | Cult of Pedagogy

Building Thinking Skills to Help Students Access Their Best Work | MindShift | KQED News

there are many “portable skills” required in any academic project, no matter the subject. These are things like determining importance, asking questions, thinking about purpose and audience, and even clarifying confusion. Students need these skills in everything they learn, but often aren’t aware of them as interstitial thinking steps necessary for a deeper analysis or more meaningful product. And often teachers don’t realize students are missing those thinking skills either.

via Building Thinking Skills to Help Students Access Their Best Work | MindShift | KQED News

Download your free copy of How to Leverage Personalized Learning in the Classroom

“The heart of personalized learning is personal — it is about knowing the person in front of you and expecting the best of them.”

via Download your free copy of How to Leverage Personalized Learning in the Classroom

7 Brain-Based Ways to Make Learning Stick

Reach. In order for any information to be stored in the brain, it must be received through sensory memory. It therefore behooves us to take into consideration novelty, need, choice, attention, motivation, emotion, and meaning to get and keep student attention.
Reflect. There’s an old joke about teaching being the instructor’s ability to take his notes and give a lecture that will go to the student’s notes without passing through either’s brain. Giving students time to “linger over learning,” may help make the connections from new material to old.
Recode. This is simply the act of students taking information and putting it in their own words. We know that self-generated material is better remembered. Writing is a memory strategy.
Reinforce. Once students have recoded, teachers must provide feedback on the recoded information. We don’t want to rehearse misinformation.
Rehearse. Strategies for rehearsal will help teachers and students discover optimal rehearsal techniques.
Review. Whereas rehearsal puts information into long-term memory, review presents the opportunity to retrieve that information and manipulate it in working memory. This act makes the memory stronger.
Retrieve. The type of assessment used can affect the student’s ability to retrieve stored information. Accessing stored memories may be reliant on specific cues.

via 7 Brain-Based Ways to Make Learning Stick

Why I Had to Develop a Unique Learner Profile to Meet the Needs of My Students | EdSurge News

With experience, I came to recognize that for my students to be successful, I needed to engagingly address academic essentials while recognizing individual student thought processes and interests. Playful learning, open-ended challenges and social activities seemed to captivate my students. Many of them chose to spend their time outside of school playing games, and it became clear that their love of games mirrored my own. A moment of inspiration came while observing my students as they played different types of games—they were fueled by various motivations. I thought, if I could identify what motivated them during play, I could tap into that during learning.

via Why I Had to Develop a Unique Learner Profile to Meet the Needs of My Students | EdSurge News

5 Unconventional Final Exams to Give Your Students Who says tests can’t be fun?

5 Unconventional Final Exams to Give Your Students
Who says tests can’t be fun?

via 5 Unconventional Final Exams to Give Your Students – WeAreTeachers

“Girls no longer have time to partake in girlhood on their own,

Girls need time to work through friendship issues — to experience conflict, negotiate and get through the natural bumps in the road. But we have them so highly scheduled that they are not using organic friendship-making skills anymore.”

via Helping Young Girls Find Their Voice While Developing Friendships | MindShift | KQED News

Shifting your mode of listening is life-changing. Changing how you listen means that you change how you experience relationships and the world. And if you change that, you change, well, everything.

The four types of listening reflect the underlying principles of the opening of the mind, heart and will are:

Dowloading: This type of listening is limited to reconfirming what we already know. Nothing new penetrates our bubble.
Factual listening: We let the data talk to us and notice disconfirming information. Doing this requires opening the mind—that is, the capacity to suspend our habits of judgment.
Empathic listening: We see the situation through the eyes of another. Doing this requires opening the heart: using our feelings and our heart as an organ of tuning in to another person’s view.
Generative listening: We listen for the highest future possibility to show up while holding a space for something new to be born.

via How are you listening as a leader? | SmartBrief

Why Self-Directed Learning Is Important for Struggling Students

The transition to personalized learning felt big, so I decided to start with something I knew was important for my students: developing autonomy. I knew that in order for my students to be successful in taking ownership, I’d have to prepare for some of the challenges around focus and motivation that initially led to my hesitation—but I also recognized that I had to let go of some control so that I could empower my students.

via Why Self-Directed Learning Is Important for Struggling Students | EdSurge News

The review of data indicates that, across all countries involved in the assessment, only 8 percent of students are considered top performers in collaborative problem solving.

Positive relationships with peers, teachers, and parents, along with particularly fair treatment by teachers, are factors associated with higher collaboration scores, as is use of the internet and social networks outside school. However, students who report playing video games regularly score slightly lower in collaboration skills.

While many school subjects provide opportunities to cultivate skills in and positive attitudes towards collaboration, physical education is especially relevant. The PISA report indicates that participation in physical activity enhances positive attitudes towards collaboration, with students who attend physical education classes once or twice a week scoring highest in collaborative problem solving.

via PISA Reports on Collaborative Problem Solving | The International Educator (TIE Online)

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